By Harold Bloom, Mark Twain

-- provides an important 20th-century feedback on significant works from The Odyssey via sleek literature-- The severe essays replicate quite a few colleges of criticism-- comprises severe biographies, notes at the contributing critics, a chronology of the author's lifestyles, and an index

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Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations)

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Extra resources for Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations)

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107–8. James Cox, to continue the available permutations and combinations, defends the ending as part of his attack on serious readings of the book. : Princeton University Press, 1966), pp. 175–82. For a general discussion of this debate, see John Reichert, Making Sense of Literature (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1977), pp. 191–203. 2. Although “psychoformalism” is not an established term, the process to which it refers was first noted by Kenneth Burke who presented a technique he called “metaphorical psycho-analysis” along with an all-too-brief reading of Coleridge’s pattern of images which served as an example, in The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action (New York: Vintage Books, 1957), 62–76.

The working notes for Huckleberry Finn are reproduced in the California-Iowa edition of the novel, 711–61. H arry G . S egal Life Without Father: The Role of the Paternal in the Opening Chapters of Huckleberry Finn C ritics have argued for generations about the failure of the ending of Huckleberry Finn. 1 While the ending has been variously defended on formal, political, aesthetic, and moral grounds, the very presence of a debate sustained for more than sixty years bears witness to the “problem” of those closing chapters.

James probably did not imagine, even as he struck the comparison, that any writer, much less an American writer, might effectively fuse both attempts in a single project, but he certainly would have approved the attempt. Not that Twain would have given a fig for James’s approval. In such matters, W. D. Howells was Twain’s admired comrade, as Hawthorne was Melville’s. ” The wickedness of Huckleberry Finn is not the wickedness of Moby-Dick, of course, but it is the sort one might expect of Huck Finn, and maybe Mark Twain.

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